Bullet journal · Crochet

Keeping track of my projects in my Bullet Journal

I use my bullet journal for several things. I started it in order to track the organisation of my wedding and the million of appointments I had to arrange for that, while having a tight working schedule. Last year I used it as a travelling notebook. This year I use it for organising all the aspects of my strangely arranged life.

One of these aspects is the fact that I am a crafter: I like crocheting and from time to time I try other things too. With my skills by now, I am doing modifications in patterns I use, so as to fit my individual needs. But this means that if I don’t note down the modifications somewhere, I will probably never be able to reproduce the same thing I created. I was keeping a notebook with small patterns I have created myself, but when I was making modifications of an existing pattern, things were starting to get confusing.

I use pinterest for ideas and inspiration. And I saw a nice idea of a page that I could modify to use for my crochet creations (I am sorry I have no idea who created it first, so as to give credit to).

20180525_102712_2
Example of my notes for the scarf I made for myself

In the first photo you can see the notes I did for the scarf I created for myself. I don’t rewrite the pattern I use. I just note the changes that I made or things that I think would be essential to remember if I try to make it again.

20180525_102742_1
Another example of the notes for fingerless gloves

In the second example, it is my notes for the fingerless gloves I made. As you may have seen, I made two pairs. I kept notes only for the first pair and I used them when I made the second one. In case I had made further modifications I would have created a new page and make a note for linking it with this one.

I like this page template: it is simple and flexible. It summarises the basic materials and has plenty of space for notes. I can modify the spaces needed according to the project I am making. I have a more consistent way of keeping notes for my projects and this way I am able to understand my notes several months after I did them. Isn’t it amazing?

For the time being, I create the page for each project once I am starting it and I insert it as it comes in the flow of my bullet journal. I have to admit though, that probably this is not the best way of saving my projects for later. I will see how it goes with this year, but I keep it in the back of my mind, that I will probably have to create a second type of bullet journal for only my crafts. I have avoided keeping two or three bullet journals, but if my crafting becomes “more professional”, I think I will have to take this part out of my everyday bullet journal.

Crochet

Fingerless gloves

Hopefully winter is over, but even in spring the weather can be cold, at least in Switzerland or the Netherlands I have been spending my last several springs. I have been looking for some nice thin gloves that I could use when I am crocheting outdoors or when I do not want to wear mittens or winter gloves. During last Christmas my husband and I had a thorough look in the Christmas Market of Zurich. We did see several nice pairs, but most of them had too long parts in the arms and I didn’t think I would enjoy that.

In the end, I decided to make fingerless gloves myself at exactly the size and the length I wanted. Looking in the internet, I found a really nice pattern for free from Crejjtion. So my problem was solved!

The original pattern suggests using a 3.0 mm hook and the finished gloves would be 21cm long and with a diameter of 18cm.

2018-04-03 15.05.05 869-IMAG3148_1.png

For the first pair I made, I started with a 3.0mm hook and a Baby Supremo Super Merinos yarn of 100% pure wool in red colour, which I had received as a present in one of the yarns exchanges I am participating from time to time. I followed the written pattern and started with 50 stitches, but after a couple of lines, I decided that neither the pattern was nicely visible, nor the fit comfortable, so I used a 3.5 mm hook instead. Another choice would be to increase the starting stitches. The increase should be by 10 stitches, otherwise the pattern would not correspond to nice shells. The best fit can be achieved by changing both the stitches and the size of the hook.

In order to make my pair of gloves shorter than the pattern suggests, I just had to decrease the rows before the thumb. Instead of 21 rows before the thumb, as the pattern suggests, I did only 13. In case you change the number of rows as me, you have to pay attention that the total is an odd number. The shells look nice only when a pair of rows is done (one that the shells are created – such as rows 3 and 5 – and one where the difference in length is equalised – such as rows 2 and 4).

For the rest of the glove I followed the instructions of the pattern.

I liked my gloves a lot! They are soft and comfortable, as well as elegant. A couple of weeks ago it was the birthday of a friend of mine here in Switzerland and trying to think of something to give her. How about a pair of fingerless gloves?

DSC02544

I made the second pair following my modifications for the first one and used a nice yarn from LANG Yarns Mille Colori Socks & Lace Luxe in shades of blue. It is a rather thin yarn of 73% wool, 25% nylon and 2% polyester, with grades of blue colour spun with a fashionable metallic thread, a characteristic that makes it look really nice. Don’t you agree?

The project did not take me long to complete. I could make a glove per day without a lot of haste.  Do try it if you want a pair of nice fingerless gloves!

P.S. Concerning the links used here, please check my Disclaimer.